Welcome to all past pupils of RGHS and RGJS

This website aims to keep the Rustenburg Alumnae family in contact with each other; provide information and news of Alumnae, the Schools and the RA Association; provide networking opportunities through the Alumnet Database.

Instagram @rustenburgalumnae

Today's COVID-19 story is from Alumna Kauthar Salie (E16). “I have seen the Instagram posts from Rustenburg Alumnae that have been assisting with the COVID-19 pandemic and it is heart-warming to see so many of my fellow Alumnae making such great contributions to the cause in our country. 
I was motivated to share my story in the hopes of raising more awareness to the cause that I am part of and feel strongly about. 
I am currently a fourth-year medical student at UCT and I am the fundraising director of SHAWCO Health, which is an organisation that many Rustenburg Alumnae are part of. SHAWCO Health is a community based, student-run NGO that provides free primary health care to under-resourced communities around Cape Town that is easily accessible, close to their homes and of exceptional quality. 
Due to the COVID-19 pandemic we have not been able to go out to our communities and provide these services but we have been raising funds to ensure that the communities that we serve are able to cope during this time through campaigns such as #bekindonline. 
In my capacity as the head of fundraising I have approached other organisations and Rotary Clubs and many of them have generously contributed to the cause. They've helped us achieve what we as an organisation strive to achieve - ensuring the health and well-being of our communities. I would like to use this opportunity to thank Kirstenbosch, Claremont and Waterfront Rotary Clubs for their generous contributions. 
During this time, I feel that many of us are overwhelmed with many emotions and we all feel the need to assist in one way or another. If you are fortunate enough to assist your fellow South African, I urge you to do it. There are many NGOs doing incredible work at the moment and we all need your assistance no matter how small - it makes the world of difference. If you are able to assist SHAWCO please follow the #bekindonline campaign on social media or email health.funding@shawco.org with any questions.”
Instagram: @shawco_uct

If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Today's COVID-19 story is from Alumna Kauthar Salie (E16). “I have seen the Instagram posts from Rustenburg Alumnae that have been assisting with the COVID-19 pandemic and it is heart-warming to see so many of my fellow Alumnae making such great contributions to the cause in our country. I was motivated to share my story in the hopes of raising more awareness to the cause that I am part of and feel strongly about. I am currently a fourth-year medical student at UCT and I am the fundraising director of SHAWCO Health, which is an organisation that many Rustenburg Alumnae are part of. SHAWCO Health is a community based, student-run NGO that provides free primary health care to under-resourced communities around Cape Town that is easily accessible, close to their homes and of exceptional quality. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic we have not been able to go out to our communities and provide these services but we have been raising funds to ensure that the communities that we serve are able to cope during this time through campaigns such as #bekindonline. In my capacity as the head of fundraising I have approached other organisations and Rotary Clubs and many of them have generously contributed to the cause. They've helped us achieve what we as an organisation strive to achieve - ensuring the health and well-being of our communities. I would like to use this opportunity to thank Kirstenbosch, Claremont and Waterfront Rotary Clubs for their generous contributions. During this time, I feel that many of us are overwhelmed with many emotions and we all feel the need to assist in one way or another. If you are fortunate enough to assist your fellow South African, I urge you to do it. There are many NGOs doing incredible work at the moment and we all need your assistance no matter how small - it makes the world of difference. If you are able to assist SHAWCO please follow the #bekindonline campaign on social media or email health.funding@shawco.org with any questions.” Instagram: @shawco_uct If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Today’s COVID-19 story is from Mishka Kadir. (E’10) “I am an Occupational Therapist, running my private practice The Quam Project. I offer all OT services, outside of lock down. 
Having recently worked in a private mental health facility, I realized that the ‘mentally sick’ are being put on the back burner and the focus is more on the physically sick during this COVID-19 pandemic. Having an affiliation with SADAG (South African Depression and Anxiety Group) has brought to my attention that their members are losing therapy time as their therapists are not available during lock down. 
Having this knowledge about those struggling during this time, and the fact that we cannot make physical contact with each other, I started a free lock down support group for those with depression and anxiety. The group takes place via Zoom, twice a week (Sundays and Wednesdays at 5 pm). The group has been making wonderful progress and we welcome new members every week. Attendance is completely up to the participant as well. The group is a therapeutic one, with myself as the facilitator. Group members can decide if they want to activate their camera and mic, and they can choose to share or just listen. There is an aura of empathy and confidentiality which is commendable of all group members. 
Even when among others, people with mental illnesses can still feel isolated and this can cause regression in them. They are alone with their thoughts, with no one to share it with - so one thought can progress to a sad thought then to a bad or harmful one and possibly a bad or harmful action which is what we definitely do not want! 
To those with a mental illness, or just a vulnerable mental state at the moment, reach out for love and help. Stay safe!” If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Today’s COVID-19 story is from Mishka Kadir. (E’10) “I am an Occupational Therapist, running my private practice The Quam Project. I offer all OT services, outside of lock down. Having recently worked in a private mental health facility, I realized that the ‘mentally sick’ are being put on the back burner and the focus is more on the physically sick during this COVID-19 pandemic. Having an affiliation with SADAG (South African Depression and Anxiety Group) has brought to my attention that their members are losing therapy time as their therapists are not available during lock down. Having this knowledge about those struggling during this time, and the fact that we cannot make physical contact with each other, I started a free lock down support group for those with depression and anxiety. The group takes place via Zoom, twice a week (Sundays and Wednesdays at 5 pm). The group has been making wonderful progress and we welcome new members every week. Attendance is completely up to the participant as well. The group is a therapeutic one, with myself as the facilitator. Group members can decide if they want to activate their camera and mic, and they can choose to share or just listen. There is an aura of empathy and confidentiality which is commendable of all group members. Even when among others, people with mental illnesses can still feel isolated and this can cause regression in them. They are alone with their thoughts, with no one to share it with - so one thought can progress to a sad thought then to a bad or harmful one and possibly a bad or harmful action which is what we definitely do not want! To those with a mental illness, or just a vulnerable mental state at the moment, reach out for love and help. Stay safe!” If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Today’s COVID-19 story is from Shireen Mukadam (E2002), who has a Master’s degree in International Affairs from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. “While I'm not on the front lines, I'm not a doctor, I became a human rights researcher though (I worked for the last four years with Amnesty International) and a writer. 
Following the WHO declaring COVID-19 a pandemic, and after the President announced a State of Disaster on 15 March, I noticed in Woolworths that people were shopping with gloves and masks. Then, when I went back to my apartment, I noticed the domestic workers and security guards and I wondered how ordinary South Africans are responding to the pandemic. I sent out a call to friends and family asking if anyone knew domestic workers who were willing to be interviewed and I conducted interviews remotely. I then wrote an article which was published by the Daily Maverick Citizen: 
https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2020-03-29-as-the-middle-class-posts-lockdown-selfies-how-are-the-poor-coping/

I think that sometimes we can get so caught up in our own worlds that we can't imagine the impact on people who have very little. This article was my attempt to show how ordinary people responded to the pandemic in the early days. 
My wish is that we are always able to highlight the different realities that exist for human beings and to be mindful of this. I believe in the power of writing to shed light and to lead to change.” If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Today’s COVID-19 story is from Shireen Mukadam (E2002), who has a Master’s degree in International Affairs from the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva, Switzerland. “While I'm not on the front lines, I'm not a doctor, I became a human rights researcher though (I worked for the last four years with Amnesty International) and a writer. Following the WHO declaring COVID-19 a pandemic, and after the President announced a State of Disaster on 15 March, I noticed in Woolworths that people were shopping with gloves and masks. Then, when I went back to my apartment, I noticed the domestic workers and security guards and I wondered how ordinary South Africans are responding to the pandemic. I sent out a call to friends and family asking if anyone knew domestic workers who were willing to be interviewed and I conducted interviews remotely. I then wrote an article which was published by the Daily Maverick Citizen: https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2020-03-29-as-the-middle-class-posts-lockdown-selfies-how-are-the-poor-coping/ I think that sometimes we can get so caught up in our own worlds that we can't imagine the impact on people who have very little. This article was my attempt to show how ordinary people responded to the pandemic in the early days. My wish is that we are always able to highlight the different realities that exist for human beings and to be mindful of this. I believe in the power of writing to shed light and to lead to change.” If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Another  COVID-19 story is from Kirsten Scobie (E2011)
Another COVID-19 story is from Kirsten Scobie (E2011) "I am currently in my second year of internship at GSH, but I’m doing a rotation in family medicine at Vanguard Clinic. Working at primary healthcare level really is showcasing how vulnerable our communities are and the shortage of healthcare workers during this pandemic. We are overburdened and the numbers of persons under investigation for COVID-19 has been rising every day, even the number of positive cases we receive back. We don’t have endless stock of personal protective equipment so we have to use it very sparingly, so one doctor each day will conduct the tests and it’s so tiring. It’s a scary thing to face and we have been scrambling every day for solutions to better combat this pandemic within the vulnerable communities. Personally, I have had a lot of anxiety about this. I’ve had sleepless nights and anxiety attacks, and it becomes lonely when you have to go home every day and self-isolate in order to not put the rest of your family at risk. But I have resorted to some things to help me keep sane, such as doing daily mindfulness, journaling and praying, having video calls with friends and family. They have been extremely supportive and are constantly sending words of encouragement. I’m not particularly excited to be on the front-lines, but this is what I have been called to do, I believe by God, and so I will serve the people because of that. Stay safe and stay home. Let’s combat this pandemic together!" If anyone is assisting, volunteering or raising funds for COVID-19, please send your story and a photograph to Geila Wills: willsg@rghs.org.za.
Today’s COVID-19 story is from Lauren Gericke (E'19)
Today’s COVID-19 story is from Lauren Gericke (E'19) "I have had a passion for animals since I can remember. I started seriously volunteering as a result of a Gr 9 Life Orientation project. Since then my mom has become a strategic member of a local animal organisation as well as her and I have volunteered at several different animal organisations throughout the years. I also have been planning a trip to the Transkei in June/July to provide relief and education for the dogs in that area. Afripaw is a local organisation that my mother and I have been volunteering with for the past two years. They aim to help provide free pet care for animals in informal settlements, especially the Vrygrond area and help educate owners on proper pet care. Since the outbreak of COVID-19 and specifically, the enforcement of a nation-wide lockdown, people in informal settlements are suffering. Many are starving and have reached a great level of desperation, as a result, many cannot afford to feed themselves let alone their animals. Afripaw has set up an initiative where money can be donated to purchase pet food, which is distributed to pet owners around the Vrygrond community. Pet owners who attend the Afripaw monthly clinic and have proven themselves as responsible pet owners are prioritised and also supplied with pet medications such as Nexguard and other medications helping to alleviate mange, ticks, fleas, and other parasites. On Friday, 24th April, Afripaw held its first distribution day where I was able to help by distributing the food throughout the Vrygrond community to ensure that the animals continue to be looked after and intern loved by their owners in this tough time. These distribution days will continue to happen so that we can try to ensure that no dogs in the area starve or become incredibly ill. This initiative thrives off of donations so that food can be purchased to be able to be distributed. I hope this story, while not as conventional as some of the others, helps to inspire those within the Rustenburg community to do what they can to help. Attached are the banking details of the initiative. #proud #proudlyrustenburg #rustenburgalumnae